New Zealand journey – Lake Pukaki to Glenorchy

Lake Pukaki

Lake Pukaki

Lake Pukaki is no doubt, one of New Zealand’s most beautiful glacial lakes. With its milky blue waters and snow-capped peaks of Mt. Cook National park as a backdrop this lake presents an amazing sight. It was created by a receding glacier and it is still fed by the flow from the Tasman and Hooker glaciers, which provides the lake with its distinctive turquoise colour.

Lake Pukaki

Lake Pukaki

We followed the road along the north shore of the lake and it took us to Lake Tekapo.  While Tekapo is not as impressive as its bigger neighbour and somewhat more developed, it is part of a UNESCO Dark Sky Reserve – meaning that it is a great spot for watching the night sky.

Lake Tekapo

Lake Tekapo

Lake Tekapo

Lupins at Lake Tekapo

After a brief exploratory wonder around Lake Tekapo we returned to Lake Pukaki and headed for the snow-capped peaks of Aoraki  (Mt Cook) National park.  The drive itself was quite spectacular framed by the glimmering waters of the lake on one side, tussock covered ranges on the other and towering peaks of the mountains ahead. The park covers over 700 km² and glaciers cover 40% of the park area.

Mt. Cook National Park

Mt. Cook National Park

Aoraki is home to most of New Zealand’s tallest peaks including the country’s highest mountain, Mt Cook at 3753 meters and Mt Tasman. A day ago we stood on the Fox glacier near the summit of Mt Cook and now we were approaching the mountain from the opposite (eastern) side.

Mt. Cook

Mt. Cook

The mountains of the Southern Alps are considered to be quite young – less than ten million years old, and they are still building at the rate of 5-10 mm per year. It’s estimated that approximately 25 km of build-up has occurred, however weather erosion is counteracting the build-up.

Mt. Cook

Sefton glacier

Mt. Cook

Mt. Cook National Park

Mt. Cook

Sefton glacier

Mt. Cook

Sefton glacier

Lake Pukaki and Mt. Cook

Lake Pukaki and Mt. Cook

From Mt Cook National Park we started the long drive back to Glenorchy.  We traveled through the rolling hills of the Central Otago, the wine country of Cromwell and the rugged hills of Kawarau Gorge.

Central Otago

Central Otago

We stopped at the Wild Earth winery that sits on the top of the gorge. Kawarau Gorge is where the Pillars of Argonath were filmed in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The pillars were off course digitally inserted later in the studio, but the bright green-blue water of Kawarau river is easily recognisable from the film.

Kawarau gorge

Kawarau gorge

Kawarau gorge

Kawarau gorge

Pillars of Argonath

Pillars of Argonath

In later afternoon we reached the quaint Arrowtown, a historic town about 20 min drive from Queenstown. It is a charming and quirky town where practically every building is Heritage-listed. Unfortunately, all we had time for was a stroll on Buckingham street and a coffee in one of the ‘cute-as-a-button’ cafes.

By the time we arrived in Glenorchy it was pitch black. We spent a while driving up and down Coll road trying to find the bunker from the set of the Vertical Limit, where we were staying overnight until we finally gave up and knocked on the door of a house at the end of the road. The door was opened by an elderly man, who promptly fetched his daughter who then fetched her husband who to our absolute relief and amazement jumped on the bicycle to show us the way to the right house.

Movie set bunker in Glenorchy

Smaller bunker

The bunker was incredibly cosy. It was two bankers in f act: a bigger one that contained a kitchenette and a smaller one that was just a bedroom. We quickly settled in and fell asleep to the sounds of neighing & galloping horses next door.

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